1. With The New Yorker recently opening their exhaustive archives for the summer, I thought it pertinent to create a list of my favourite The New Yorker pieces from The New Yorker the better to aid your enjoyment of The New Yorker.

    ALL FALL DOWN by Susan Orlean Inside the dark, drug-fuelled world of Competitive Jenga.

    FROG-MATE by Malcolm Gladwell What tadpoles can teach us about chess.

    THE STRANGE UNDULATING SPECTRUM OF TREE-PATTERNS OBSERVED FROM A HIGHWAY by Haruki Murakami A man makes a bowl of soup.

    — 

    The Only New Yorker Longreads Guide That Still Matters

    More spot on satire through link.

  2. Sensors and computers monitor the soil-moisture levels of restaurant plants and water them automatically, sparing workers a menial task and giving them time better spent interacting with customers or honing kitchen skills. Every corporate document that comes in is scanned and shredded, allowing Muir and Clover’s managers to call up anything — an employee’s kitchen safety training certification, a produce order from 2009 — on their phones from anywhere. Clover uses Google Docs and YouTube to share recipes and training videos across the company. If the supply kit delivered in the morning from the central hub in Inman Square includes an ingredient pack for a new chilled roasted-tomato soup, employees at any truck or restaurant can easily check the visuals for what the tomatoes should look like caramelized or how to garnish the finished soup with cilantro and sour cream.

    — Clover Food Lab’s secret ingredient? Data. Lots of it. - Magazine - The Boston Globe

  3. The last time we showed up (“Bring Back Crystal Pepsi,” last weekend), the pro-lifers put away all their signs, put down their bullhorns, stopped yelling at people going into the clinic, and just started praying for me. It went on for probably twenty minutes, all of them just praying around that Crystal Pepsi sign.

    — Talking to Tina Haver-Currin, Steadfast Pro-Choice Protester and Gentle, Brilliant Troll | The Hairpin

  4. (via Iced Coffee | Counter Culture Coffee)

  5. (via INFOGRAPHIC: How Letters Are Distributed in English Words | Electric Literature, seen on The Rumpus)

    (via INFOGRAPHIC: How Letters Are Distributed in English Words | Electric Literature, seen on The Rumpus)

  6. Oh, That Summer Glow: Healthy or Harmful? — Bostonia Web Exclusives →

    Point-counterpoint on the sun exposure science. Gives a nice view of how scientists’ perspectives are driven by their their own research topics and how their perspectives and recommendations are based on their perception of what the public does with recommendations.

    I would love to see some public health work synthesizing the existing research on pros (Vit D related benefits) and cons (skin cancer) of sun exposure into more broadly considered guidelines.

  7. America Is Getting the Science of Sun Exposure Wrong - Issue 14: Mutation - Nautilus →

    interesting piece contrasting the Australian and American recommendations for sun exposure and the lack of skin color based recommendations in the US. Worthy of fact checking because article takes a side, but until I get around to that, my personal sun strategy is validated. (Avoid burning, don’t worry too much about natural tanning, with my light but tannable skin.)

  8. Inspired by Silicon Valley guru Paul Graham’s seminal essay to “do things that don’t scale,” they sourced cookies from bakeries in their three markets—snickerdoodles in San Francisco, frosted red velvet in L.A., classic chocolate chip in Washington, D.C.—which the ninja delivered, wrapped, along with the freshly laundered clothing. The gesture added another logistical wrinkle to an already complicated business, but it was worth it. “In the beginning, people loved it,” says Metzner. “Our social media went crazy, like, ‘Oh my God, Washio is the best!’ ” That was in the beginning. One Wednesday morning this spring, after staff at Washio had gathered for their daily “stand-up” meeting—a ritual suggested in the Manifesto for Agile Software Development, a 2001 work-­processes manual that advocates keeping employees on their toes by having them give status updates literally on their feet—operations manager Sam Nadler broke some bad news. “Actually,” he said, “we’re starting to get a lot of requests for healthy treats instead of cookies.” Ha, well, of course they were. Entitlement is a straight line pointing heavenward, and it should come as no surprise to Washio, where business is based on human beings’ ever-increasing desires, that their customers were upping the ante yet again.

    — Silicon Valley’s Laundry-App Race — New York Magazine

  9. “Nothing is really crazily bad, though there are certainly things we’ve tried making that weren’t spectacular, like a mideastern mushroom stroganoff,” Varshney insists when I ask. “Out of the 20 most recent dishes, 17 or 18 have been really good.” (via Try The First Recipe Devised By IBM’s Supercomputer Chef | Co.Design | business   design)

    “Nothing is really crazily bad, though there are certainly things we’ve tried making that weren’t spectacular, like a mideastern mushroom stroganoff,” Varshney insists when I ask. “Out of the 20 most recent dishes, 17 or 18 have been really good.” (via Try The First Recipe Devised By IBM’s Supercomputer Chef | Co.Design | business design)

  10. There are some things I need to confess. This isn’t easy to say, but after working as a real scientist with a Ph.D. for 6 years, I feel it’s finally time to come clean: Sometimes I don’t feel like a real scientist. Besides the fact that I do science every day, I don’t conform to the image—my image—of what a scientist is and how we should think and behave. Here’s what I mean: I don’t sit at home reading journals on the weekend. I have skipped talks at scientific conferences for social purposes. I remember about 1% of the organic chemistry I learned in college. Multivariable calculus? Even less. I have felt certain that the 22-year-old intern knows more about certain subjects than I do. I have avoided eye contact with eager grad students while walking past their poster sessions.

    — Read on: Forgive Me, Scientists, for I Have Sinned | Science Careers