1. The last time we showed up (“Bring Back Crystal Pepsi,” last weekend), the pro-lifers put away all their signs, put down their bullhorns, stopped yelling at people going into the clinic, and just started praying for me. It went on for probably twenty minutes, all of them just praying around that Crystal Pepsi sign.

    — Talking to Tina Haver-Currin, Steadfast Pro-Choice Protester and Gentle, Brilliant Troll | The Hairpin

  2. (via Iced Coffee | Counter Culture Coffee)

  3. (via INFOGRAPHIC: How Letters Are Distributed in English Words | Electric Literature, seen on The Rumpus)

    (via INFOGRAPHIC: How Letters Are Distributed in English Words | Electric Literature, seen on The Rumpus)

  4. Oh, That Summer Glow: Healthy or Harmful? — Bostonia Web Exclusives →

    Point-counterpoint on the sun exposure science. Gives a nice view of how scientists’ perspectives are driven by their their own research topics and how their perspectives and recommendations are based on their perception of what the public does with recommendations.

    I would love to see some public health work synthesizing the existing research on pros (Vit D related benefits) and cons (skin cancer) of sun exposure into more broadly considered guidelines.

  5. America Is Getting the Science of Sun Exposure Wrong - Issue 14: Mutation - Nautilus →

    interesting piece contrasting the Australian and American recommendations for sun exposure and the lack of skin color based recommendations in the US. Worthy of fact checking because article takes a side, but until I get around to that, my personal sun strategy is validated. (Avoid burning, don’t worry too much about natural tanning, with my light but tannable skin.)

  6. Inspired by Silicon Valley guru Paul Graham’s seminal essay to “do things that don’t scale,” they sourced cookies from bakeries in their three markets—snickerdoodles in San Francisco, frosted red velvet in L.A., classic chocolate chip in Washington, D.C.—which the ninja delivered, wrapped, along with the freshly laundered clothing. The gesture added another logistical wrinkle to an already complicated business, but it was worth it. “In the beginning, people loved it,” says Metzner. “Our social media went crazy, like, ‘Oh my God, Washio is the best!’ ” That was in the beginning. One Wednesday morning this spring, after staff at Washio had gathered for their daily “stand-up” meeting—a ritual suggested in the Manifesto for Agile Software Development, a 2001 work-­processes manual that advocates keeping employees on their toes by having them give status updates literally on their feet—operations manager Sam Nadler broke some bad news. “Actually,” he said, “we’re starting to get a lot of requests for healthy treats instead of cookies.” Ha, well, of course they were. Entitlement is a straight line pointing heavenward, and it should come as no surprise to Washio, where business is based on human beings’ ever-increasing desires, that their customers were upping the ante yet again.

    — Silicon Valley’s Laundry-App Race — New York Magazine

  7. “Nothing is really crazily bad, though there are certainly things we’ve tried making that weren’t spectacular, like a mideastern mushroom stroganoff,” Varshney insists when I ask. “Out of the 20 most recent dishes, 17 or 18 have been really good.” (via Try The First Recipe Devised By IBM’s Supercomputer Chef | Co.Design | business   design)

    “Nothing is really crazily bad, though there are certainly things we’ve tried making that weren’t spectacular, like a mideastern mushroom stroganoff,” Varshney insists when I ask. “Out of the 20 most recent dishes, 17 or 18 have been really good.” (via Try The First Recipe Devised By IBM’s Supercomputer Chef | Co.Design | business design)

  8. There are some things I need to confess. This isn’t easy to say, but after working as a real scientist with a Ph.D. for 6 years, I feel it’s finally time to come clean: Sometimes I don’t feel like a real scientist. Besides the fact that I do science every day, I don’t conform to the image—my image—of what a scientist is and how we should think and behave. Here’s what I mean: I don’t sit at home reading journals on the weekend. I have skipped talks at scientific conferences for social purposes. I remember about 1% of the organic chemistry I learned in college. Multivariable calculus? Even less. I have felt certain that the 22-year-old intern knows more about certain subjects than I do. I have avoided eye contact with eager grad students while walking past their poster sessions.

    — Read on: Forgive Me, Scientists, for I Have Sinned | Science Careers

  9. (via Janne Kyttanen 3D-prints essential travel items with Lost Luggage kit)

Print all the clothes you forgot! Just be sure to remember underwear, cause the dress is see through…

    (via Janne Kyttanen 3D-prints essential travel items with Lost Luggage kit)

    Print all the clothes you forgot! Just be sure to remember underwear, cause the dress is see through…

  10. Quick-sort with Hungarian (Küküllőmenti legényes) folk dance (by AlgoRythmics)

    Um, a group called the Algo-Rhythms made videos using traditional dancers to demonstrate sorting algorithms. I feel cheated that I did not get such demonstrations in my intro CS class.